Version 3.0 Questions

To see if you have myOrigins Version 3.0:

  1. Sign in to your kit.
  2. Navigate to your myOrigins page.
  3. On the left sidebar, next to the Origins heading, Version 3 is displayed if you have received the most recent update.


If you still have myOrigins Version 2.0, check the “updates” section in the upper-left side of your Dashboard for a note with your expected Version 3.0 results date. 

Additionally, an email will be sent to your primary email address when your updated results have posted.

We updated our algorithm and added more reference populations so that we can give you more refined results.

Version 3.0 

In myOrigins Version 3.0, we are comparing your DNA to 90 reference populations for which you could possibly receive a percentage.

  • For Africa, there are now 21 reference populations. 
  • For Asia and Oceania, there are now 33 reference populations.
  • For the Americas, there are now 9 reference populations.
  • For Europe and the Middle East, there are now 27 reference populations.

Version 2.0 

In myOrigins Version 2.0, we compared your DNA with only 24 reference populations.

  • For Africa, there were 4 reference populations. 
  • For Asia and Oceania, there were  6 reference populations.
  • For the Americas, there were 2 reference populations.  
  • For Europe and the Middle East, there were 12 reference populations.

Your DNA itself did not change, but the data with which we use to compare your DNA and to determine your regional ethnicity percentages changed. Because we have added additional reference population data and updated our algorithm used to calculate this data, we are able to refine your results.

  • In myOrigins Version 3.0, we are comparing your DNA to 90 reference populations for which you could possibly receive a percentage.
  • In myOrigins Version 2.0, we compared your DNA with only 24 reference populations.

Because of advances in ethnicity testing over the past few years, the reference populations we’re comparing your DNA to in Version 3.0 are more precise than the reference populations from Version 2.0. This added precision, along with the addition of numerous reference populations in each region, allows us to refine your results, which may cause your results and populations to change.

Because of advances in ethnicity testing over the past few years, the reference populations we’re comparing your DNA to in Version 3.0 are more precise than the reference populations from Version 2.0. This added precision, along with the addition of numerous reference populations in each region, allows us to refine your results, which may cause a particular ethnicity to drop off.

Each test goes through quality control checks prior to the results being approved and posted to your account. If we have a question about the quality of your results, we will not publish them, but instead, we will reprocess them until we get results we are confident are accurate.

FamilyTreeDNA is confident in the accuracy of our myOrigins results. FamilyTreeDNA is constantly working to improve the products we offer to our customers. The field of autosomal DNA and ethnicity testing is newer than most sciences, but rapidly growing and improving each year. We work to incorporate new developments and cutting-edge technology to get the best results possible for you. With this in mind, it means that your results may change again when new updates are implemented.

We do not expect another update to come anytime soon, but we work to incorporate new developments and cutting-edge technology to get the best possible results for you. With this in mind, it means that your results may change again when new updates are implemented. 

FamilyTreeDNA is confident in the accuracy of our myOrigins 3.0 results. We have made improvements and additions to our reference populations and our algorithm to refine the results we bring to our customers.

While these results may not coincide perfectly with your genealogy, they are correct based on the information found in your DNA compared to our reference populations. Your DNA being more similar to a different region does not discount or disprove any genealogy records you may have.

The myOrigins results are created by comparing the tester’s DNA to the DNA of people in our reference populations. Each reference population is carefully crafted and comprised of samples that are well documented from the region they represent.

Sub-continental regions have a high rate of migration and admixture, and so, genetic markers from a different region than you may have expected can often show up in your DNA.

The new results are based on years of testing and advancement in science. We have updated our website to provide these results to the entire database, so it is not possible to display the old version of the test on a particular account. However, you are able to download your myOrigins 2.0 results as a CSV. To access this, click your myOrigins results. In the top left, there will be a downward-facing arrow. Click that arrow to initiate the download. 

To access a CSV file of your Version 2.0 results:

  1. Sign in to your kit.
  2. Navigate to your myOrigins page.
  3. At the top of the left sidebar, click the downward pointed arrow.

 

General Questions

A reference population a group of individuals that is a proxy for (and genetically representative of) an ancestral population.

No. Only your autosomal DNA results from the Family Finder microarray chip are used. The myOrigins tool does not use mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), X-chromosome DNA, or Y-chromosome DNA results.

You receive half of your autosomal DNA from your mother and half from your father, but the half that you receive goes through a process called random recombination. Random recombination means you have inherited a random mix of your parents’ percentages, rather than an even half of their percentages. Because of this, you may not have received results from a specific region for which you have an ancestor.

myOrigins results are your personal genetic ancestry that reflects the last 100 to 2,000 years (about four to 80 generations). They may also reflect one population that mixed with another in ancient times and became fixed in one of your populations.

No. Strict political boundaries (ancient or current) do not set variance in human genetics. There has always been movement between geographic regions. These migrations cause gradients in the frequencies of each genetic marker.

myOrigins is often able to detect ancestry from groups such as Jewish and Amerindian. However, it should not be used to disprove family history. Note that, it is possible that you have an ancestor with which you do not share a detectable amount of genetic ancestry.

myOrigins can detect a significant Amerindian contribution to your genetic ancestry. If you have a 100% genetically pre-Columbian ancestor in your recent genealogy, myOrigins is highly likely to detect it.

Generation Relationship Percentage
1 Self 100.00%
2 Parent 50.00%
3 Grandparent 25.00%
4 1st Great Grandparent 12.50%
5 2nd Great Grandparent 6.25%
6 3rd Great Grandparent 3.13%
7 4th Great Grandparent 1.56%

For example, if your great-grandmother was 100% pre-Columbian Amerindian, myOrigins will detect your approximately 12.5% Amerindian ancestry.

myOrigins is also likely to detect Amerindian ancestry that is a high percentage of a modern population. As another example, if you have all four grandparents with Amerindian ancestry from North Mexico, your myOrigins results will reflect the amount of pre-Columbian ancestry that is within a normal range for those with North Mexican heritage.

However, the available reference populations limit the ability of the program to identify your specific ancestral group. It may also under detect heritage that comes from a distinctive unrepresented group such as the Na-Dene.

Remember that you may have an Amerindian ancestor but not have sufficient genetic heritage from them to be detected by a DNA test. This is due to the randomness of autosomal recombination.

Therefore, genetic testing can confirm your ancestry but not disprove it.

Judaism is a religion and not an attribute definable by a DNA mutation, but we can give you hints about having Jewish ancestry by comparing your Family Finder results to those of known Jewish ancestry in our database. myOrigins results may also provide clues to recent Jewish ancestry in the last five generations.

A clue to your having recent European Jewish ancestry is the number of matches you have in the Family Finder database. Due to endogamous marriage patterns, there is a high level of inter-relatedness in European Jews. If you have recent Jewish ancestry, you will then have a high number of Jewish cousins on your matches page, likely in the 1000s of matches.

A clue to your having recent European and non-European Jewish Ancestry comes from the myOrigins ethnic percentages results. Most people with Jewish genetic ancestry will see Jewish ancestry here. However, if you show only a small amount of Jewish genetic matching, it is not proof of recent Jewish ancestry. This is because the genetic match may be from a much more distant genetic admixture that became fixed in your recent ancestors’ population. Please note that we are able to assist with Ashkenazi, Sephardic, Mizrahi, and Yemenite Jewish ancestry.

If you have a known European genealogy and partial genetic ancestry from Africa, it indicates that some of your ancestry is traced to Africa. It is important to note that North Africa is considered part of the Middle East region, but there is a gradient of genetic similarity between African and North African populations. Your genetic ancestry may be from ancestors who were taken to Europe and the Americas as indentured servants and slaves.

At times, the source may first trace back to those who intermarried with Amerindians.

When considering what genetic ancestry from Africa means to you and your research, you should consult the full list of reference populations for the region of Africa and each of its populations. Click here for a list of myOrigins regions and Population Clusters.

The most likely reason for someone with European ancestry to have genetic ancestry from the Americas is a previously unknown Amerindian ancestor. This may be from North, Central, or South America. In some cases, the source may include people who were taken to Europe by European explorers during the early years of European colonization.

When considering what genetic ancestry from the Americas means to you and your research, you should consult the full list of reference populations for the region of the Americas and each of its populations. Click here for a list of myOrigins regions and Population Clusters.

For someone with Eastern European ancestry, some genetic ancestry from Asia is expected due to historic population expansions from the East.

When considering what genetic ancestry from Asia means to you and your research, you should consult the full list of reference populations for the region of Asia and each of its populations. Click here for a list of myOrigins regions and Population Clusters.